It’s Time for the Mets to Move on from Their Captain

david_wright_33

 

Okay. I know what you guys are thinking. Especially you, Mets fans. He’s still a solid player when he’s healthy, but that four letter word previously mentioned is the most important thing you’ll read this entire article; when. Wright has played just 38 and 37 games over the past two seasons and has played north of 112 games just once since 2013. SO, I pose this question. Should Mets move on from David Wright before he’s most remembered for his injury history when he should be praised for his play? I say yes.

It’s undeniable fact that Wright is one of the Mets greatest players in its franchise history and definitely the best over the last decade or so. Offensively, Wright is the franchise leader in hits, runs, RBI, total bases, doubles, walks, and WAR. He’s second in games played and second in home runs as well. Stats matter sometimes, and although they don’t tell you the entire story, it shows the great years Wright has put forth for a very storied franchise.

But the amount of years Wright has been in the league I briefly touched on in the paragraph above is what is coming around to bite Wright in the ass. The Captain is now 34-years old and father time is knocking on the door. Most recently, Wright has come down with another injury, this time in his shoulder. It’s hindering his throwing ability so he’ll be shut down until further notice, putting opening day in question. According to MLB.com, Doctors believe the injury has something to with the neck surgery he had last June. Yikes.

Anytime one injury directly connects with another, the status of that player going forward simply doesn’t look good and it doesn’t sit well with me. It doesn’t make me feel comfortable with that player moving forward, as the thought of injury will linger in the back of my mind every single time he’s involved in the game at all. As I mentioned in the intro, Wright’s played just 75 games over the past two seasons, so beginning the season on the disabled list is less than ideal for an already injury-prone player.

As for Wright’s production on the field, here are his numbers from 2014-’16;

 

  • 209 G
  • .266/.339/.396/.735 slash line
  • 20 HR
  • 94 RBI
  • 96 R

 

Those numbers are really solid for a 162 game campaign. Unfortunately for the third basemen, it’s 209 games, and it’s over a three-year span. He’s never had elite power, but what power he did have has virtually evaporated. At this point, when healthy, Wright is a glorified singles hitter with enough sauce to shoot one into the gap at times. Maybe even channel his inner Rey Ordonez and belt one out of the park like Rey did 12 times during his career.

The Mets window is closing by the day and just in 2015, they proved that they can go the distance even without their captain manning the hot corner everyday. It’s obviously different in 2017 than it was two years ago due to the team’s roster construction, but bringing in someone who will be on the field and contribute every game is key.

Wright’s production and glory years, so to speak, won’t go unnoticed if he were released, traded or waived. That being said, the Mets should consider it in my opinion. Father time catches up to everyone — except Bartolo Colon — and he’s having a chat with David Wright a lot sooner than everyone thought.